NEOVETS and NEO Colleges collaborate to Support Veterans

NEOVETS and NEO Community Colleges have collaborated to deliver the CMTE (Certified Military Talent Employer) capabilities to veteran employers in NEO.  The CMTE is a certification that assures designated employers recruit, select, cross walk, and retain veterans in NEO.  It is a sustainable approach to attracting and retaining veterans that is renewed every two years.

Check out our site for specifics about the CMTE and visit us to learn more at one of the conferences listed below.

Career Fair, Lorain County Community College

LCCC John A. Spitzer Conference Center

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Noon to 3 p.m.

1005 N. Abbe Rd.

Elyria, OH

 

Cuyahoga Community College

Advanced Technology Training Center

Monday, May 2, 2016 

10 a.m. – 6 p.m.

3409 Woodland Avenue

Cleveland, OH 44115

 

NEOVETS CMTE Workshop

Lorain County Community College

John A. Spitzer Center

Friday, May 20, 2016  

9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

1005 N. Abbe Rd.

Elyria, OH

 

NEOVETS Conference and CMTE Workshop 

Conference 8 to 12

Workshop 1 to 5

Lakeland Community College

Friday, May 27

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Kirkland, OH 44094

 

NEOVETS Conference and CMTE Workshop

Conference 8 to 12

Workshop 1 to 5

Cuyahoga Community College

Mid-late May, 2016

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

3409 Woodland Avenue

Cleveland, OH 44115

 

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The Increasing Value of Flexibility

 

The Increasing Value of Flexibility

One of the strongest trends in Human Resources we have witnessed over the last five to ten years is the increasing value of flexible scheduling to employees. Not too long ago, in yet another study, this one reported in Fast Company Magazine, one-third of employees reported, “managing work-life balance has become more difficult”. Particularly with employees working longer hours (another trend we are seeing), flexible schedules allow employees to coordinate their lives to reduce stress and have better work experiences.

Global Research

More recently, a study from EY across companies in the United States, United Kingdom, India, Japan, China, Germany, Mexico and Brazil polled almost 10,000 full-time employees about work-life challenges. Their goal for this research was “to understand what employees seek in a job— why they stay, why they quit, and how this differs by generation.”

Work-life Balance is Becoming more Difficult to Attain

This research found (in each of the countries studied) work-life balance is becoming increasingly difficult to attain. Employees in Germany and Japan reported the greatest difficulties in managing work/family/personal responsibilities, and China reported the least. Across the globe, nearly half (46 percent) of the managers polled said they work more than 40 hours per week. Moreover, 40 percent reported working more hours, compared with five years ago. This increase in hours could be the rationale for increased requests for flexible schedules.

Pressures on Millennials

When moving into management positions and starting families, increases in hours create a situation that makes work-life balance especially challenging. More younger generation respondents experienced an increase their hours. Among Millennials, almost half (47 percent) indicated an increase in hours, while fewer Generation Xers (38 percent) and Baby Boomers (28 percent) saw their work schedules expand. Of course, having longer workdays makes for a more difficult work-life balance.

What Matters to Candidates

When asked about what’s important in the hiring process, respondents first listed “competitive pay and benefits” (an answer that we thought they had moved away from). Second was “being able to work flexibly and still be on track for promotion”. According to EY, these flexible perks included “receiving paid parental leave and not working excessive overtime”.

Why Employees Leave

This EY study also reported the top five reasons for people quitting their jobs: “minimal wage growth, lack of opportunity to advance, excessive overtime hours, a work environment that does not encourage teamwork, and a boss that doesn’t allow you to work flexibly.” 

What these Findings Mean to HR Execs

Wise HR professionals will take note of these findings and urge their employers to place more emphasis on work-life balance. For years, forward-thinking employers and associations have focused their energies to help employees and their members with this critical balance. As we move into the future, this shift will not be optional. (Some would say it isn’t now.) The ability to recruit and retain talent will depend on it.

Special thanks to Lauren Dixon writing in Talent Management Magazine for her effective coverage of this important topic.

Copyright 1998-2015 by The Herman Group, Inc. — reproduction for publication is encouraged, with the following attribution: From “The Herman Trend Alert,” by Joyce Gioia, Strategic Business Futurist. 336-210-3547 or http://www.hermangroup.com. The Herman Trend Alert is a trademark of The Herman Group, Inc.”

 

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New Business Start-Ups Growing, Except in US  – guest blogger Joyce Herman

Now number 12 among developed nations for new business startups, the United States has fallen behind a number of other countries, including Hungary, Denmark, Finland, New Zealand, Sweden, Israel, and even financially troubled Italy. One of the most successful crowdfunding sites, OurCrowd.com, is only in the business of funding Israeli start-ups.

Though many countries of the world encourage entrepreneurship, entrepreneurs built the US. That’s why we were surprised to learn in a recent Gallup report that “for the first time in 35 years, [US] business deaths now outnumber business births”. The US Census Bureau reported that for the first time ever though 400,000 new businesses were founded last year, 470,000 were closed.

According to Jim Clifton, CEO of Gallup Polls, in the US “the root of the problem comes down to three issues: 1) difficulty of accessing capital (loans); 2) excessive and burdensome government regulations; and 3) an overall malaise about our economic future”.

Entrepreneurship in Brazil and Mexico Fuels Start-Ups

Entrepreneurship is responsible for part of Brazil’s economic development. The country’s efforts to promote its culture of innovation and entrepreneurship promise to support that growth in the coming years. According Endeavor Brazil, an organization working to promote high-growth entrepreneurship in the country, young businesses play a crucial role in Brazil’s economic and social future. Currently, small and medium size-enterprises (SMEs) are responsible for 96 percent of the jobs in Brazil and comprise 98 percent of all companies in the country.

In 2014, Mexico City was named one of the “world’s best start-up hubs” by Virgin Entrepreneur magazine.  Mexico is a very sociable country and that sociability extends into business dealings. Moreover, the Mexican people are very friendly and build relationships easily. In this country, money enables everything. Generally, salaries are low, so entrepreneurs can afford to employ good people to do whatever they need. Finally, a young vibrant economy offers many business opportunities.

Colleges and Universities Support Entrepreneurship

Universities worldwide play an important role in creating a country’s entrepreneurial and innovation ecosphere. University-based incubator programs flourishing around the world at many colleges and universities. Ubiquity University, a new online university, that will serve students worldwide, will require every business student to engage in a startup.

What’s Next for Business StartUps?

Expect Generation Z/The Homelanders to be even more entrepreneurial than their predecessors in Generation Y—The Millennials. Many of these new businesses will be in the service industry providing contractors to larger companies in a variety of different fields. Alternatively, they will carve out small local markets providing qualified, experienced contractors, like “Swimazing” in Austin, Texas that offers private swimming lessons for adults and children in private pools throughout the area.

Special thanks to Ted Daywalt for coverage of the US aspect of this important topic in the VetJobs Early Eagle.

The Herman Group, 7112 Viridian Lane, Austin, Texas 78739 USA 336.210.3548 www.hermangroup.com

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Working Less and Doing More – Part 3

Conquer Your Technology: Get a Divorce


Our last great productivity tool is also the biggest destroyer of productivity: technology.

Beware; You Will Have To Change Your Current Behavior!!

Silence It or Close It and Maintain Focus!!

  • Close all applications on your computer and smart phone that do not pertain to work. Save these “fun” and “distraction” apps for later when you are on lunch or have left work.
  • When you have tasks that require computer time, stop to think a bit before you open your computer. Make a list of what you need to do during your computer time.

 Now you know your computer time schedule.
  • Do one task, then, stand up and step away from the computer. Get a drink. Remind yourself the task is done. Put the tool down. Don’t access a game, Facebook or email unless it is scheduled time.
  • Then come back, do the next task, and so on. Rather than being a distraction creator, your computer can return to being a useful tool.

You’ll soon find yourself working less, doing more, and leaving early enough to go home and have a wonderful life.

Want to improve a distracting behavior, or hone a high performance behavior?  Call or email – we are standing by to help: chad@cookconsulting.biz or 330-329-3137.

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Working Less and Doing More – Part 2

With large offices of cubicles and common areas, comes the opportunity to drop in and visit others easily. People stop by your desk with urgent issues and questions and expect you to respond immediately.

Beware; You Will Have To Change Your Current Behavior!!

Delay Distractions and Maintain Focus!!

  • Be prepared! Create an interruption list. When visitors arrive with a distraction, jot down the details on your interruption list. “Vacation dates for 2016 – call Peter”
  • If it’s an emergency, of course you deal with it then and there; but, if not, you schedule the interruption.
  • Choose a block of time, preferably late afternoon, perhaps 4 p.m. Schedule a half hour for “interruption catch-up.” Tell your co-worker, “I’m busy right now. How about if I get back to you around 4 p.m.?”
  • When your catch-up time arrives, run through the list and handle the interruptions.
  • If your office generates a lot of interruptions, and you still need time to focus, you may schedule multiple interruption times in a single day. Then you defer any given interruption to the time block that seems most reasonable.

Telling your co-worker that you’ll have to defer his or her need until later can be done with respect. Use a calm, gentle tone. Frame your message in terms of your work needs and their benefits. “I’m currently working on this weeks payroll and need to give 100% of my time and attention to it at present. I’ll put you on my calendar for 4 p.m.”

You’ll soon find yourself working less, doing more, and leaving early enough to go home and have a wonderful life.

Need help with changing to this behavior?  Give a call 330-329-3137.

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Working Less & Doing More – Part 1

Companies today expect more work from fewer people. This creates an action orientation that is driven by checklists of tasks. Some of us get lulled into doing low-priority work that has little value just to get it off our list of “to-do’s”.

There is an easy solution!!

Beware; You Will Have To Change Your Current Behavior!!

Prioritize Your Tasks to Focus On the Important Work

  • Circle the three to five most important projects or tasks on your list that require your attention today.
  • Now commit to spending ten-minute increments on each. And, immediately start working on the first one. When the ten minutes are up, stop where you are and move on to the second task. Repeat until you’ve made it all the way through the list of circled tasks. Now take a ten-minute break.
  • Commit for fifteen or twenty minutes each task/project this time (whatever your tolerance for change can take), and do it again.
  • Take another break, then commit for 30 minutes per task/project. And so on.
  • When you know you’ll be working such a short burst of time, any resistance you have is more likely to disappear. Moreover, since your brain knows you’ll be hitting all your important projects, rather than obsessing about what you’re not doing, you can focus completely on each task in sequence.

Speed processing your tasks is not multitasking! Never try to do two things at once, don’t respond to interruptions, and give 100% focus to each task as you work.

You’ll soon find yourself working less, doing more, and leaving early enough to go home and have a wonderful life.

Questions or comments?  call 330.329.3137 or email chad@cookconsulting.biz

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